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JAMA

Achieving Health Equity by Design

April 14, 2015

Disparities in health outcomes by race and ethnicity and by income status are persistent and difficult to reduce. For more than a decade, infant mortality rates have been 2 to 3 times higher among African American populations, rates of potentially preventable hospitalization have been substantially higher among African American and Latino populations, and the complications of diabetes have disproportionately afflicted African American and Latino populations.1 These and other disparities have persisted despite recognition that inequity costs the economy an estimated $300 billion per year.2 In addition, health disparities threaten the ability of health care organizations to compete fiscally as insurers increasingly base payments on quality and outcomes, such as reducing preventable admissions and readmissions.

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Although it is the most talked about, China is not the only Asian economy looking to Africa – and bankers are moving to facilitate the flow of capital.

A case in point: South Africa’s Standard Bank announced a partnership on 23 April with the largest bank in South Korea to provide services for its clients doing business in Africa.

The agreement with Woori Bank, which has been in the process of privatising from state ownership since 2010, aims to support the South Korean lender’s clients even though the bank has no presence in the region.

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China Railway Construction Corp Ltd (CRCC) has signed two deals worth a combined $5.5 billion for construction projects in Africa, Xinhua reported late on Monday, as the country’s railway firms increasingly flex their muscle overseas.

CRCC’s China Civil Engineering Construction Corporation (CCECC) unit will work on a $3.5 billion intercity railway line in Nigeria’s southwestern Ogun state, Xinhua said, citing the area’s state governor, Ibikunle Amosun. Read more

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Medical experts have hailed a malaria vaccine that will prevent millions of young children from catching the disease, which could be available in October after trial results found that it reduces number of cases by half.

Researchers say the vaccine, which has just completed the final stages of testing, could make a ‘substantial contribution’ to controlling the disease.

Drug firm, GlaxoSmithKline has applied for a licence from the European Medicines Agency (EMA) for the RTS,S vaccine. The news is significant because RTS,S is the first malaria vaccine to reach advanced trials. Read more

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JAMA

April 14, 2015

The Health of Young African American Men

Deaths in Ferguson, Missouri; New York City; Sanford, Florida; and other areas have focused international attention on young African American men. In a recent campaign, young African American men draw attention to key overlooked facts that describe their demographic: 1 of 3 goes to college, 3 of 4 are drug free, 5 of 9 have jobs, 7 of 8 are not teenaged fathers, and 11 of 12 finish high school.1 How can clinicians help address existing health disparities and add to these positive outcomes?

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Mr. Demetric A. Duckett:  is the Chief Financial Officer at Go Africa Network Inc.

Mr. Duckett is also the chief business development officer for TruFund Financial Services where he directs the organization’s national business growth strategy.  Mr. Duckett develops and oversees strategic partnerships and elaborates new lending programs and product opportunities.  He also directs TruFund’s marketing and communications functions.

Prior to joining TruFund, he was Vice President for Capital Access Programs at Carver Federal Savings Bank where he developed industry-leading M/W/BE capital access programs, Vice President of Community Development at Bank of America, and Vice President and Global Relationship Manager at BankBoston.

A native of South Carolina, Mr. Duckett holds a B.A. in French from Furman University and a Master of International Business from the University of South Carolina.

He is fluent in French, Portuguese, and Spanish, and his principal volunteer activities include serving as a board member for African Services Committee and South Bronx Overall Economic Development Corporation.

About: Dr. Bruce M. Henry

Dr. Bruce M. Henry is currently a Senior Medical officer at Go Africa Network Inc. and has been a Pediatric Emergency Medicine Physician at Nyack Hospital, Nyack New York since 2006.

Dr. Henry has served as a Pediatric Emergency Medicine Physician at the following institutions in the past 20 years over an evolving time period.

  • Pediatric Emergency Services, Harlem Hospital Center, New York
  • Children’s Hospital of New York, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, New York
  • The New York Hospital-Medical Center of Queens, Flushing, New York
  • St. Barnabas Hospital, Bronx, New York

Dr. Henry has also served in an instructional capacity at the aforementioned institutions and at The Borough of Manhattan Community College for more than 15 years within a temporal duration and capacity.

Dr. Henry has provided his services to Organization for International Development and doctors without borders for over 15 years.

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Around 600,000 people die from malaria every year. The vast majority of these deaths occur in Africa, where female Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes are responsible for transmitting malaria between people.

Current mosquito control methods, which include insecticide-covered bed nets and indoor insecticide spraying, have dramatically reduced malaria transmission in many communities. But they have little impact on mosquitoes that bite outdoors.

In a world-first study, a team of international scientists has discovered a chemical called cedrol that attracts pregnant female Anopheles mosquitoes. Read more

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February 24, 2015

A Finnish study found daily saunas protect middle-aged men against heart attacks.

Men’s Fitness

MEN’S FITNESS

The Finnish are clearly onto something. Though the Angry Birds ship has sailed—we feel your deep-seeded jealousy toward Rovio’s genius, too—you can jump on Finland’s health bandwagon by stepping into a sauna.

Frequent sauna trips (baths? sits?) may help you live longer, a Finnish study published in JAMA Internal Medicine has found. Saunas are to Finland what Starbucks is to America. For a population of 5.3 million people, there are 3.3. million saunas in Finland, according to InterNations.org. And they have good reason to cherish their sweatboxes.

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MEDIA ALERT:

 Go Africa Harlem Community Launch Event on May 5th 2015 @ MIST Harlem Kicks Off the Countdown to First Go Africa Harlem Street Festival taking place on July 18th 2015

 WHO: Go Africa Network Inc. in conjunction with the Association Nationale Des Senegalais D Amerique Inc. and supported by Manhattan Community Board 10; Halstead Property; The Consulate General of Senegal; The Delegate General of Cote d’Ivoire; Ambassador of Guinea, Consulate General Guinea; The office of Bronx Borough President; The Honorable W. Franc Perry, Judge of Civil Court of the City of New York; The African Advisory Council of the Bronx Borough President; and the Ambassadors, Consul Generals, and Trade Boards of numerous  African countries to promote  to the Cultural, Trade & Commerce, and Heritage of Africa and the African diaspora communities In the New York City Area and throughout the world. Read more