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SCIENTIFIC DISCOVERY AND THE FUTURE OF MEDICINE

JAMA

April 14, 2015

The Culture of Organs, a book published in 1938 by Nobel Laureate Alexis Carrel and well-known aviator Charles Lindbergh, described how organs could be kept “alive” in culture for months, with the intent to reuse them. Decades later, regenerative medicine, a field of science that aims to restore or establish normal function by replacing or regenerating human cells, tissues, and organs affected by disease, is becoming a reality. The field is a progression of previous efforts to restore function, ranging from prosthetics to organ transplants. Advances in cell biology, biomaterial science, and biological molecule discovery have led to new options for cellular therapies, engineered tissues and organs, and new strategies to stimulate endogenous repair and regeneration.

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Men’s Fitness

1 Eat six small meals a day. Stoking your body with food every three to four hours can rev your metabolism to the max.

2 Run 10 100-yard sprints and burn up to 500 calories.

3 Wait 20 minutes before going for seconds.

4 Throw on a hoodie before working out. When your muscles are warm, you actually burn more calories.

5 Use a smaller dinner plate – it’ll limit how much you can pile on.

6 Use a blue dinner plate. Studies show the color has an appetite suppressing effect (as opposed to red and yellow plates).

7 Sub in nonfat Greek yogurt for mayo and sour cream – you’ll save 700 cals and 100 cals per half cup, respectively.

8 Eat peanuts from their shells. You’ll nosh on 50% fewer nuts in a sitting just trying to peel before eating.

9 Chew on sugar-free mint gum after a meal. Mint flavors send signals to your brain that it’s time to stop eating.

10 Snack on pistachios instead of pretzels.

11 Take up power yoga. You can burn up to 344 calories a class.

12 Train fasted once a week. This helps the body to keep adrenaline high and blood sugar low.

13 Run intervals. Turn your body into a fat-fighting furnace by alternating sprints with jogs.

14 Replace your morning bagel and juice with a bowl of oatmeal and protein-packed eggs.

15 Work out with your partner. Couples who train together are 34% more likely to stick to their workouts.

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Drones are a controversial topic when it comes to national security. However cargo drones, with their potential applications for last mile delivery in remote areas and humanitarian emergency situations, are tipped to be an exciting area of innovation for Africa.

But who is behind the push for cargo drones in Africa, why has it got the business world so excited, and how is progress on this embryonic technology panning out?

Cargo drones are small pilotless airplanes designed to transport 20-30kg packages across distances of 80km or perhaps further. The technology could have a revolutionary impact for delivering products to remote, poorly connected communities in much of Africa. Read more

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As the evolution of mobile banking continues to disrupt the financial services sector, the founder and executive chairman of privately held telecoms conglomerate Econet Wireless Group sounded the death knell for traditional transaction banking.

“The transactional side of banking is gone,” Strive Masiyiwa tells This Is Africa on the side of a Clinton Foundation forum in Marrakech, Morocco. Read more

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According to a report via cp-africa.com, Airtel Nigeria has inked an agreement with device manufacturing firm, RLG. The deal will see RLG produce handsets for potential Airtel subscribers.

The regional director of RLG in West and Central Africa, Tosin Ilesanmi, stated that the company will begin to produce handsets, tablets, power banks and other devices at its Ilesa factory. According to Ilesanmi, the company could create up to 10,000 jobs with the venture. Read more

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SFGATE

 

 

With vivid burgundy seeds and a distinctive sweet flavor, the pomegranate is a nutrient-dense fruit that is fun to eat and steeped in history. Its medieval French name originates from the Latin roots for “apple” and “seedy,” according to the University of California. It was first cultivated in Iran, but spread to the Mediterranean area and later to the Americas. People during the Middle Ages thought pomegranates were good for liver inflammation, a common malady in men, but today, other male health benefits are being discovered.

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JAMA

February 24, 2015

 

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved a first-of-its-kind weight loss treatment device that electronically suppresses hunger signals traveling between the stomach and the brain. The Maestro Rechargeable System, which is manufactured by EnteroMedics of St Paul, Minnesota, consists of an electrical pulse generator, wire leads, and electrodes that are implanted into the abdomen and intermittently send electrical pulses to the vagus nerve.

A new device targets the brain-stomach nerve connection that controls feelings of hunger and satiety.

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Ghana’s mobile phone sector is booming. The country’s regulator NCA reported that the country’s mobile phone operators signed up some 400,000 subscribers during February, a sign that the sector is prime for a new round of promotions.

The regulator said that the total number of customers has now reached 31.03 million. Read more

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MTN Business today unveiled the first truly Pan African Internet of Things (IoT) platform, providing African enterprises with greater control and advanced management features for their connected devices and sim cards.

The launch also sees the introduction of a global Machine-to-Machine (M2M) sim card, which gives customers the same rate for M2M activity across MTN’s footprint in Africa. Read more

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New York City’s melting pot has been boiling over in the larger metropolitan area.

Long Island, the lower Hudson Valley and northern New Jersey, home to thousands of recently arrived unaccompanied minors and older immigrants, have nearly as many people eligible for legal services as does the city. But outside the city, there has been a shortage of lawyers to serve those potential clients. Read more