Rose of Sharon

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From shaking up Nigeria’s fashion scene to striking it rich in the oil business, Nigerian billionaire Folorunso Alakija has tasted success in all walks of life.

The former banking executive-turned-fashion designer-turned oil magnate is one of the west African country’s most accomplished businesswoman, boasting a long and successful career in several fields.

In recent years, the 61-year-old has been dedicating her time to give back and help those in need as an author and philanthropist — in 2008, she launched the Rose of Sharon foundation, a non-governmental organization that provides for widows and orphans across Nigeria. Read more

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Imagine an ID card that remembers all of your personal records. This one card serves as your driver’s license and a catch-all that includes information about your health insurance, tax payments, and bank accounts. Oh, and it’s a MasterCard.

Now imagine you’re required to have it to vote. By 2019, that will be the case in Nigeria, where the government is running a large-scale pilot program with MasterCard, the U.S. credit card giant. An initial 13 million Nigerians will participate in the pilot program, but all those above the age of 16 — a whopping 160 million people — are expected to carry the cards by 2019.

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“A crisis in the global village needs urgent global response” Interesting article; a cause  for concern:

Africa: How Africa is Losing the Ebola Battle

ANALYSIS

A combination of fear of the Ebola virus, weak public infrastructures in three of the world’s poorest countries, and a slow response by the international public health community and world governments is reversing real progress in Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea. Read more

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In Concourse Village in the Bronx, Sylvester Donkor, left, and Ataa Serwaa, immigrants from Ghana, waiting for a cab to church. Credit Damon Winter/The New York Times

Threatened with arrest in 2009, Lamin F. Bojang fled Gambia after publicly contradicting its president’s claims that he could cure AIDS. Now 31, Mr. Bojang lives in Concourse Village in the Bronx with his wife and 2-year-old son and works as a receptionist at Kingsbrook Jewish Medical Center in Brooklyn, while working toward a bachelor’s degree in political science at City College.

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