Zoeticx

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Zoeticx has written middleware which can unify data from any current provider into a single common format. Their newly released API provides easy access to that middleware, enabling developers to easily write applications against multiple databases storing records in different formats.

There are currently over 350 competing formats for storing medical records electronically.

Zoeticx’s middleware, known as the Patient-Clarity platform, resides in the cloud. It uses gateways to communicate with the different Electronic Medical Record (EMR) formats, and transforms them into a custom, common format provided by Zoeticx. Currently the five most common formats are supported — Epic, Cerner, Allscripts Sunrise, Allscripts Professional, and OpenVistA. The gateways are designed against a shared interface, making it easy to add more formats. Read more

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Amelia, experts say, is “the next level up” from IBM’s Watson supercomputer.

In 1998, an independently wealthy New York University doctoral student gave up his assistant professorship in math and founded a company to build software that could mimic the human brain—a “cognitive” platform that could learn a job, not just search for programmed answers.

On Sept. 29, IPsoft—now a global company little known outside the world of IT infrastructure services—unveiled Amelia, which consulting firm Gartner calls “the next level up” from IBM’s Watson supercomputer and “a breakthrough innovation” that signals “the end of outsourcing as we know it.” Read more

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A device called the Rochester Cloak uses an array of lenses to bend light, effectively rendering what is on the other side invisible to the eye. And you can try it for yourself.

One of the problems with the cloaking devices developed to date — and it’s a big one — is that they really only work if both the viewer and whatever is being cloaked remain still. This, of course, is not entirely practical, but a difficult problem to solve.

For the first time, researchers have made a cloaking device that works multidirectionally in three dimensions — using no specialised equipment, but four standard lenses. Read more

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When Jennifer Hopper raced to the emergency room after her husband, Craig, took a baseball in the face, she made sure they went to a hospital in their insurance network in Texas. So when they got a $937 bill from the emergency room doctor, she called the insurer, assuming it was in error.

But the bill was correct: UnitedHealthcare, the insurance company, had paid its customary fee of $151.02 and expected the Hoppers to pay the remaining $785.98, because the doctor at Seton Northwest Hospital in Austin did not participate in their network. Read more

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A drug used to treat advanced breast cancer has had what appears to be unprecedented success in prolonging lives in a clinical trial, researchers reported on Sunday.

Patients who received the drug — Perjeta, from the Swiss drug maker Roche — had a median survival time nearly 16 months longer than those in the control group.

That is the longest amount of time for a drug used as an initial treatment for metastatic breast cancer, the researchers said, and it may be one of the longest for the treatment of any cancer. Most cancer drugs prolong survival in patients with metastatic disease for a few months at most. Metastasis means the cancer has spread to other parts of the body. Read more

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In 2012 the United Nations General Assembly created a mechanism to monitor commitments made by African countries and their partners to improve Africa’s economic development. The Office of the Special Adviser on Africa (OSAA) is the secretariat for the mechanism, and works with other UN agencies to track progress on these commitments. Maged Abdelaziz, United Nations’ secretary-general’s special adviser on Africa, talks about what the UN hopes to accomplish with the monitoring mechanism. Read more

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PULLMAN, Wash. — Amateur videos of police officers doing their jobs have become part of the fabric of urban democracy, with embarrassing or violent images spreading via social media in minutes.

But more police agencies, especially after the unrest following an unarmed teenager’s shooting in Ferguson, Mo., are recording events with small body-mounted cameras.

In just the last few weeks, law enforcement agencies in at least a dozen cities, including Ferguson; Flagstaff, Ariz.; Minneapolis; Norfolk, Va.; and Washington, have said they are equipping officers with video cameras. Miami Beach approved the purchase of $3 million worth of cameras for police officers, parking enforcement workers, and building and fire inspectors.The New York Police Department, the nation’s largest urban force, has studied how Los Angeles is incorporating body cameras and is planning its own pilot project. A law in New Jersey, signed this month, requires all municipal police departments to buy car-mounted or body cameras, and creates a new fine on drunken drivers to help pay for it. And the United States Border Patrol, with more than 21,000 agents, recently said it would start testing cameras this year. Read more

Caribbean Cultural Center African Diaspora Institute

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When Marta Moreno Vega walked through the old firehouse, tattered pinups littered the floor, rats scurried along cracked walls, and parts of the Romanesque ceiling had fallen to the floor. But still she saw her dream: A space that could, once again, become an anchor in its East Harlem community.

“It’s just a lovely space,” Ms. Vega, president of the Caribbean Cultural Center African Diaspora Institute, said last week on the eve of a ceremony at the building her organization will take over. “It’s small, yet majestic.”

For nearly 40 years, Ms. Vega has steered the cultural institute she founded, a nonprofit organization focused on documenting, exploring and celebrating cultures of the African diaspora. Its headquarters were in a brownstone in the Hell’s Kitchen neighborhood, but it moved uptown last year. Read more

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The thermometer showed a 103.5-degree fever, and her 10-year-old’s asthma was flaring up. Mary Bolender, who lives in Las Vegas, needed to get her daughter to an emergency room, but her 2005 Chrysler van would not start.

The cause was not a mechanical problem — it was her lender.

Ms. Bolender was three days behind on her monthly car payment. Her lender, C.A.G. Acceptance of Mesa, Ariz., remotely activated a device in her car’s dashboard that prevented her car from starting. Before she could get back on the road, she had to pay more than $389, money she did not have that morning in March.

“I felt absolutely helpless,” said Ms. Bolender, a single mother who stopped working to care for her daughter. It was not the only time this happened: Her car was shut down that March, once in April and again in June.

This new technology is bringing auto loans — and Wall Street’s version of Big Brother — into the lives of people with credit scores battered by the financial downturn. Read more

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Abuja — The Minister of Science and Technology, Dr Abdu Bulama, said on Tuesday in Abuja that Nigeria would design, fabricate, test and launch its indigenous satellite by 2018.

Bulama stated this when he inspected facilities at the Obasanjo Space Centre of the National Space Research and Development Agency (NASRDA).

The minister said the centre had the mandate to launch Nigeria’s first indigenous satellite by 2018, and described space science and technology programme as an important component of the Nigerian dream. Read more