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Men’s Fitness

1 Eat six small meals a day. Stoking your body with food every three to four hours can rev your metabolism to the max.

2 Run 10 100-yard sprints and burn up to 500 calories.

3 Wait 20 minutes before going for seconds.

4 Throw on a hoodie before working out. When your muscles are warm, you actually burn more calories.

5 Use a smaller dinner plate – it’ll limit how much you can pile on.

6 Use a blue dinner plate. Studies show the color has an appetite suppressing effect (as opposed to red and yellow plates).

7 Sub in nonfat Greek yogurt for mayo and sour cream – you’ll save 700 cals and 100 cals per half cup, respectively.

8 Eat peanuts from their shells. You’ll nosh on 50% fewer nuts in a sitting just trying to peel before eating.

9 Chew on sugar-free mint gum after a meal. Mint flavors send signals to your brain that it’s time to stop eating.

10 Snack on pistachios instead of pretzels.

11 Take up power yoga. You can burn up to 344 calories a class.

12 Train fasted once a week. This helps the body to keep adrenaline high and blood sugar low.

13 Run intervals. Turn your body into a fat-fighting furnace by alternating sprints with jogs.

14 Replace your morning bagel and juice with a bowl of oatmeal and protein-packed eggs.

15 Work out with your partner. Couples who train together are 34% more likely to stick to their workouts.

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JAMA

February 24, 2015

 

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved a first-of-its-kind weight loss treatment device that electronically suppresses hunger signals traveling between the stomach and the brain. The Maestro Rechargeable System, which is manufactured by EnteroMedics of St Paul, Minnesota, consists of an electrical pulse generator, wire leads, and electrodes that are implanted into the abdomen and intermittently send electrical pulses to the vagus nerve.

A new device targets the brain-stomach nerve connection that controls feelings of hunger and satiety.

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Muscle & Body Magazine

Omega-3 fatty acids from fish oil can help you.

Supplements are great when taken in conjunction with a healthy diet and exercise plan, but some supplements can be viewed as more essential than others. A good protein blend, for example, is crucial for building muscle and preserving lean body mass, but beyond the aesthetic reasoning behind most supplements on the shelves today, there is one in particular that belongs at the top of your list: omega-3 fatty acids.

These fatty acids derived from fish oil have been a staple in my supplement regimen for years due to their positive effects on my physical and athletic performance, as well as their brain-boosting, heart-healthy and anti-inflammatory properties. If you’re not taking an omega-3 supplement, now may be the time to start.

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The new machine that could one day replace anesthesiologists sat quietly next to a hospital gurney occupied by Nancy Youssef-Ringle. She was nervous. In a few minutes, a machine — not a doctor — would sedate the 59-year-old for a colon cancer screening called a colonoscopy.

But she had done her research. She had even asked a family friend, an anesthesiologist, what he thought of the device. He was blunt: “That’s going to replace me.” Read more

cardiovascular disease

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Men’s Fitness

Your grandparents never thought twice about eating foods that were loaded with saturated fat. Not long ago, people drank milk with cream on the top, ate whole eggs for breakfast, and enjoyed steak for dinner—and led normal, healthy lives. Yet today, despite all the warnings we’re told to heed about saturated fat and its deleterious effects on the heart, cardiovascular disease is more prevalent than ever. We corralled some of our most trusted nutritionists and asked for their best advice on saturated fats.

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President's Malaria Initiative

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Durham, NC — The latest statistics show impressive progress in the fight against malaria — a 46 percent decrease in infections among children in sub-Saharan Africa and an estimated 4.3 million deaths averted globally.

A substantial increase in international funding has contributed to those achievements. The U.S. government is among the major funders of malaria control through its President’s Malaria Initiative– one of the few international assistance programs that has garnered bipartisan support through the Bush and Obama terms. Read more

HealthDay

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HealthDay

Taking aspirin every day appears to reduce the odds of developing and dying from colon, stomach or esophageal cancer, a new study suggests.

Based on a review of available studies, researchers determined that the benefits of aspirin therapy for preventing cancer outweigh the risks. Millions of people already take this inexpensive drug to prevent or treat heart disease.

“We came to the conclusion that most people between the ages of 50 and 65 would benefit from a daily aspirin,” said lead researcher Jack Cuzick, head of the Center for Cancer Prevention at Queen Mary, University of London.

“It looks like if everyone took a daily aspirin, there would be less cancer, and that would far outweigh any side effects,” added Cuzick.

Gastrointestinal bleeding is the most serious side effect associated with aspirin.

Taking aspirin for 10 years could cut colon cancer risk by around 35 percent and deaths from colon cancer by 40 percent, the researchers reported Aug. 6 in the Annals of Oncology.

Daily aspirin also can reduce the risk of esophageal and stomach cancers by 30 percent and deaths from these cancers by 35 to 50 percent, the investigators reported.

Dr. Leonard Lichtenfeld, deputy chief medical officer at the American Cancer Society, said this study falls short of a recommendation that everyone take aspirin to prevent cancer. “But it rises to the level that people should have a discussion with their doctor,” he said.

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Men’s Fitness

The latest fad in homeopathy to hit the United States has roots in an un­likely place: the salt caves of Eastern Europe—a sort of primordial spa where people flocked for eons to treat ailments ranging from respiratory illnesses to skin infections. Dry salt therapy (or, as it’s officially known, “halotherapy”) involves basking in the sodium-rich air of small, custom-crafted “salt chambers.” Its lack of regulation and scientific backing hasn’t stopped its surge in popularity. According to Ulle Lutz, president of consultation service Salt Chambers Inc., about 150 halotherapy facilities have sprung up in the U.S. in the past two years. We gave one a test run.

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Medical experts have hailed a malaria vaccine that will prevent millions of young children from catching the disease, which could be available in October after trial results found that it reduces number of cases by half.

Researchers say the vaccine, which has just completed the final stages of testing, could make a ‘substantial contribution’ to controlling the disease.

Drug firm, GlaxoSmithKline has applied for a licence from the European Medicines Agency (EMA) for the RTS,S vaccine. The news is significant because RTS,S is the first malaria vaccine to reach advanced trials. Read more

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Around 600,000 people die from malaria every year. The vast majority of these deaths occur in Africa, where female Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes are responsible for transmitting malaria between people.

Current mosquito control methods, which include insecticide-covered bed nets and indoor insecticide spraying, have dramatically reduced malaria transmission in many communities. But they have little impact on mosquitoes that bite outdoors.

In a world-first study, a team of international scientists has discovered a chemical called cedrol that attracts pregnant female Anopheles mosquitoes. Read more